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Major oil spill off Southern California coast kills wildlife

10:59, 04 October 2021
Major oil spill off Southern California coast kills wildlife Photo: AGAMI/M. Guyt via www.imago-imag/Global Look Press

Several crews are working hard to limit environmental damage , as it is believed that the reason for the disaster was the underwater pipeline. The oil spill was noticed late October 2, off the coast of southern California.


The massive crude oil spill may lead to catastrophe as the alleged source of the leak - a pipeline, has been temporarily suspended to work. Divers are continuously working in an attempt to find the exact cause of the spill. 

The officials said that there is a connection between oil rig Elly and the pipeline breakdown, just within 5 miles from the Huntington Beach.

The alleged pipeline has spat approximately 126,000 gallons (476,961 liters)  into the water.

“I don't expect it to be more. That’s the capacity of the entire pipeline,” Amplify Energy CEO Martyn Willsher said at a news conference on Sunday.

Crews of skimmers ruled by the United States Coast Guard install the floating barriers, called booms, to stop the hazardous oil spread.

The off California oil leak is presumed to be one of the largest in recent Southern California history.

People are reporting to have seen harmed animals and dead fish on the shore as the oil has reached Huntington Beach and washed on the shore. 

Environmentalists tend to think that the situation would become more deteriorating if the crude oil pushes inland, polluting fragile wetland environments. 

“We are already having reports of dolphins being seen swimming through the oil slick. They can’t get away from it quickly. And now it has reached land,” Heal the Bay CEO Dr. Shelley Luce told KTLA.

“This is a toxic spill. And many, many animals are going to die. And many more than we can count, because they will occur at sea.” 

Huntington Beach Mayor Kim Carr said that all the forces that work with federal, state and county partners were deployed to “mitigate the impact” of the leak, which may lead to ecological disaster.